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 ANGELA WRIGHT - ARTIST
info:  angelawright@artinst.entadsl.com

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ART INSTALLATIONS ... p1

 

 

 

"PLOT -3 136"  -  "SILENT MOVIES" GROUP EXHIBITION  -  Q PARK (UNDERGROUND CAR-PARK), CAVENDISH SQUARE, LONDON, W1


discarded black garments and black felt 'flowers', on black car-parking plot (-3 136)
16 to 18 Oct 2015


Photos: Angela Wright  /  David Carr-Smith

LINK: Making the work


The exhibition of around 100 artists was arranged on the lowest circular floor (-3) of the car-park under this central London gardened-square. The curators specified that works must be achromatic in colour - this ensured they were not perceived as separate from their achromatic location (which was thus not demoted to mere background exhibition space). Consequently this extraordinary location added its unique experiential characteristics to the exhibition: a sense of the unspecified depth of this accumulation of art, isolated from memory of an outside, deeply sunk underneath the busyness of streets; the sense of a secret vault enhanced by the claustrophobic compression of the low space; the endless circling of the curving view without clear locational clues or rememberable exits ... always only able to apprehend a segment, ones communion with immediate exhibits was made special by repeated discovery and loss around the curving road.

Around the outer and inner edges of the circular car-park floors were precise solid black rectangular parking-plots, contrasting with the pale grey concrete and displaying their stark white numbers. A few - tucked into occasional structurally awkward spaces - were skewed parallelograms. I chose the most tense of these distorted rectangles as the base of my work. 

My black flowers for ‘Silent Movies’ were made from many items of black clothing and over 1000 felt ribbons. The use of black challenged me - its heaviness and association with funerals were almost prohibitive in a year of distressing losses. It was important to relate to the location and I found the restrictions, for instance the curatorial imposition of black or white; the unalterable tube light at the front of my work which plunged its rear into darkness; the skewed shape of my chosen plot, all extremely interesting - as a result things happened within the work which I could not have foreseen. My work is very much about placing and I worked in situ on "Plot" for nine hours without stopping - I think this intensity and exactness could be experienced by its viewers.

The work provoked conversation, it was likened to Baudelaire's 'flowers of evil'; to charcoal; to a fantastic magnification of the granular surface of the car plot itself; to a grave; to a submerging depth. My partner likened my abandoned clothes to temporarily abandoned cars: without their purpose both these body-shells become anomalous. 

 

 

"ONCE OUT OF NATURE"  -  RURAL SITES & HARTS LANE STUDIOS, NEW CROSS GATE, LONDON, SE14


garments, canes, locations 
In cooperation with Julian Wright
16 Dec 2014  to 14 Feb 2015


Photos: Angela Wright  / Videos: Julian Wright

LINK: Making the work (videos: Julian Wright & Angela Wright)


The results of this collaboration between Angela Wright and photographer/video-maker Julian Wright were presented in Harts Lane Studios. The exhibition was the culmination of four days of work on two contrasting rural sites near Leigh-On-Sea, Essex - the first on the tidal mud of the Thames estuary and the second on fields overlooking the estuary below Hadleigh Castle.

The collaboration consisted of the two practitioners agreeing on locations and general strategies, and then working separately on making and recording Angela's insertions of 'flower-like' structures made of garments and canes into the two locations. 

 

 

STAIR INSTALLATION AT FLEMING COLLECTION  -  13 BERKELEY ST, LONDON, W1
 http://flemingcollection.com/


hand-wound wool balls, plus site
Commissioned by the Fleming Collection
6 Jan 2015  to 14 Feb 2015


Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct and Adam Curtis of Real Shetland Co - for the wool
Photos: David Carr-Smith


This work was commissioned for the staircase of the Fleming Collection, with the intention that it should 'connect' the street-level gallery with the first floor exhibition space and relate to what is concurrently displayed there: the 'Large Tree Group Tapestry'. In reference to this tapestry I chose naturally coloured wool ranging from grey, through cream to chocolate brown. The installation is made of numerous hand-rolled balls of this undyed-wool - small varicoloured ones (whose making was assisted by volunteers) and large cream ones. The small balls form a flat circular wall 'picture' that both focuses one's destination and relates to the circular cut outs of the balustrades plugged with the larger balls of cream wool that rhythmically pace one's ascent. While this wall piece and balustrade intervention soften the hard lines of their practical and severe environment, they are also in acute positional tension with features of the stair, most obviously with the two circular landing-lamps and the wooden newel-post balls.

 

 

"WOOL WALK" INSTALLATION  -  SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL, LONDON BRIDGE (S END), SE1 9DAA


seven wool hanks (two natural white / five color dyed), plus site
dimensions (approx): hank length: 30.5m /
work length: 23m
C
ommissioned by the Wool Marketing Board
5 to 12 Oct 2014


Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct
and Adam Curtis of Real Shetland Co - for the wool
Photos: David Carr-Smith / Angela Wright


This overhead wool installation in Southwark Cathedral's "Lancelot's Link" passage acts as a 'guide' towards the Campaign for Wool "Interiors Collection". The installation is a very straightforward introduction to the elaborate objects displayed in that temporary exhibition
. Its coloured hanks, as if hung up to dry, are simply dragged over the support wires, they are even still tied in their wool bands - it signifies: 'this is how the wool comes to us, and these [objects in the exhibition] are what these long simple hanks can become'. Angela said "I think the installation has a job to do and does it well. True to the nature of the beast the colours of the stripes are more random and not straight lines - you sometimes see more of one colour than another and I like that, as I said it's more like a painting". The whole thing is rhythmical, the V-shaped wires march down the length and the wool seems to slither from wire to wire, hanging off at the ends as if it wants to reach the floor. It's quite disconcerting overhead, somewhat 'too alive' - much 'faster' than the slow architecture of the passage.


 

"40 DAYS"  -  SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL, LONDON BRIDGE (S END), SE1 9DAA
http://cathedral.southwark.anglican.org
 
wool yarn, plus site (reredos, altar, chancel)
dimensions: hank approx 25m / reredos 15.3m
Commissioned by
Southwark Cathedral
05 Mar to 18 Apr 2014


Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for the wool

Richard Collinge and Rachel Storey at Fred Lawton & Son Ltd - for blending and spinning the wool
Photos: Angela Wright / David Carr-Smith / Julian Wright


This work consists of a large installation of wool hanging from the apex of the 15.2m high altar reredos, covering its central gilded figures of Jesus. It partners "another hour", an installation by Edmund de Waal in the retro-choir beyond the reredos.  

This installation combines the two hanks of wool given by Martin Curtis: the original hank used in the first wool installation in "Wallspace" 2009 and the '40 countries' wool hank used in the London, Sydney, Shanghai, Soeul exhibitions [see below].

JULIAN WRIGHT                                                                           
                                         
JULIAN WRIGHT                         

 

 

WOOL INSTALLATION (ver 6)  -  WOOL MODERN EXHIBITION,  ARA ART CENTRE,  INSA-DONG,  SOEUL,  S KOREA
 http://www.campaignforwool.org/woolmodern/
 
wool yarn and rope
Commissioned by the Campaign For Wool
18 to 25 Nov 201
3


Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for the wool

Richard Collinge and Rachel Storey at Fred Lawton & Son Ltd - for blending and spinning the wool
Photos: Angela Wright


This fourth 'derivative' from the original Wool Installations. Based on a hank made from a blend of wools acquired from 40 different countries. The final object was formed on site: the top level of the Ara Art Centre, Seoul, as part of an exhibition of wool-based design products, the fifth and last such exhibition in a world campaign by the wool industry.

 

 

"UNWANTED"  -  ST. LUKE'S CHURCH,  64 OLD SHOREHAM ROAD,  BRIGHTON,  SUSSEX,  BN1 5DD
 
unwanted items donated by the congregation + Angela's unwanted plastic twine + satin-fabric donated by the church
dimensions (approx): h: 1.6m / w: 3.3m
8 to 26 May 2013


Photos:
David Carr-Smith


I came to St Luke's to make an installation not knowing what I would find. I had asked if the congregation would donate unwanted objects - I had in mind unwanted presents and things we buy two of by mistake. 'Unwanted' has a poignancy that extends beyond mere objects to people - it served my wish that the work should provoke emotions. I needed to know what was hidden in the several cardboard boxes of donations. Coincidently they included a three-tiered fruit-stand which (influenced by the fact that a circular chandelier once hung from the east end roof) was raised like an offering and became my installation's central suspended 'mandorla-source'. Through this many meters of twine were threaded, a wriggling cascade that spread and connected the miscellaneous objects. It was my wish to elevate the status of all these unwanted things, to make them viable, desirable and freshly needed. Placed on rich satin fabric they became like jewelry in a display box, gorgeous sweets, or weird variegated fungi inter-connected by a mycelium of white twine life-lines.

 

 

WOOL INSTALLATION (ver 5)  -  WOOL MODERN EXHIBITION,  BUND 18 GALLERY,  THE BUND,  ZHONGSHAN E ROAD,  SHANGHAI, CHINA
 http://www.campaignforwool.org/woolmodern/
 
wool yarn and rope
Commissioned by the Campaign For Wool
22 to 28 Oct 2012


Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for the wool

Richard Collinge and Rachel Storey at Fred Lawton & Son - for blending and spinning the wool

Photos: Angela Wright
& David Carr-Smith


This third 'derivative' from the original Wool Installations. Based on a hank made from a blend of wools acquired from 40 different countries. The final object was formed on site in the Bund 18 Gallery, Shanghai, as part of an exhibition of wool-based design objects, mainly fashion. The fourth such exhibition in a world campaign by the wool industry.

 

 

"LEAF BALL"  -  DULWICH PARK (WEST ENTRY GATE LODGE),  COLLEGE ROAD,  LONDON,  SE21
 
green-waste prunings & gardening twine plus site
15 Oct 2012 to 15 Mar 2013


Photos:
David Carr-Smith
/ Angela Wright

LINK: Making and installing the work


The "Leaf-Ball" was initially made for the Gate-Lodge lawn of Dulwich Park's College Road entry lodge. It utilised seasonal shrub prunings provided by the Park's head gardener; which were incorporated as received onto the growing ball. The resulting surface changed in colour and structure each time new materials were added. It was first worked in a studio then in situ in the Park, where its changes of appearance and increasing size attracted the attention of the frequent local visitors. 

Two stages of the work are shown below.

 

 

"SHARED POSSESSION"  -  WAREHOUSE,  55 GREAT SUFFOLK STREET,  LONDON,  SE1
 
flour plus site
4 to 6 July 2012


Thanks to: "Guerilla Architects" http://www.hiddenborough.org
Photos: Angela
Wright


This empty early 19th century warehouse has a curious ownership problem which has prevented its redevelopment: the local council has claim to a 2½m portion of its north end that intrudes beyond the general line of its flanking road's south edge. Internally the ambiguity of this portion of the building is not discernable - Angela however (motived by the potential loss of this part of its space with its two-century accumulation of traces) for the first time in its history made it briefly so. On level two (the least obstructed) she rapidly demarcated the contested area by sieving flour - covering its massive wood in a uniform surface of clean white. By hiding the floor's colour this snowy surface revealed its 'landscape' of physical abrasions, and offered an inexhaustable field of food for mice.

 

 

WOOL INSTALLATION (ver 4)  -  WOOL MODERN EXHIBITION,  PIER 2/3,  HICKSON ROAD,  WALSH BAY,  SYDNEY,  AUSTRALIA
 http://www.campaignforwool.org/woolmodern/
 
wool yarn and rope
Comissioned
by the Campaign For Wool
25 Apr to 1 May 2012


Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for the wool

Richard Collinge and Rachel Storey at Fred Lawton & Son - for blending and spinning the wool

Photos: Angela
Wright


The second 'derivative' from the previous Wool Installations.  It is based on a hank made from a blend of wools acquired from 40 different countries. The final object was formed on site in the Pier 2/3 gallery as part of an exhibition of wool-based design products, the third such exhibition in a world campaign by the wool industry.

This version of the wool piece is in an extremely different location than the conventional art gallery in London - this was a dramatically 'primitive' and unadorned pier, whose vast plank floor roofs the harbour's sloshing water and whose high-set strip of windows, set over huge loading doors, admitted shafts of violent sunlight across its surface ...

I decided to turn the work's 'back' to the main central space and the strong afternoon sun, while its arms flowed into the unencumbered 'aisle' side space ...

 

 

WOOL INSTALLATION (ver 3)  -  "WOOL MODERN" EXHIBITION,  LA GALLERIA,  PALL MALL,  LONDON, SW1
 http://www.campaignforwool.org/woolmodern/
 
wool yarn and rope
Commissioned by the Campaign For Wool
7 to 29 Sep 2011


Thanks to: 
Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for the wool
Richard Collinge and Rachel Storey at Fred Lawton & Son - for blending and spinning the wool
Patrick Sweeney - technical consultant
Photos: Julian Wright / David Carr-Smith / Angela
Wright


A 'derivative' from the previous Wool Installations. A hank of wool made (as were the others) by laying down yarn drawn from several cones. This time however the yarn was spun from a blend of wools acquired from 40 different countries. The final object was formed on site in the gallery as a contribution to an exhibition of wool-based design products, which constitutes the opening event in a world campaign by the wool industry.

 

 

"189 MILES" WOOL INSTALLATION (ver 2)  -  BRADFORD CATHEDRAL,  1 STOTT HILL,  BRADFORD
 
wool yarn and rope plus site
22 May to 26 June 2010

Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for providing the wool
Patrick Sweeney - technical consultant

Photos: David Carr-Smith / Angela Wright


My first "189 Miles" Wool Installation was made in April 2009 in an 18th century London church - All Hallows on the Wall. This new version (but made with the same hank) is in the 15th/19th/20th centuries Bradford Cathedral - at the centre of (what remains of) the wool industry. During its London installation I was often asked "where will the wool go next" I always replied that "I want to take it back to Bradford to the home of my wool sponsors". 

I visited the Cathedral and was immediately drawn to the Peace Chapel, it had a special feeling for me, a sense of an island - a safe place. I wanted to add to this Chapel a work that had calmness, stillness, serenity and beauty, combined with a sense of Bradford's history. The wool's softness, warmth and smell spans lifetimes from infancy to old age. In the Chapel is Charles Kempe's Crucifixion window - it became important that the centrally suspended wool hank would also reveal like a portal its central image of a crucified Christ.

 

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"189 MILES" WOOL INSTALLATION (ver 1)  -  "WALLSPACE",  ALL HALLOWS CHURCH,  83 LONDON WALL,  LONDON,  EC2
 http://www.wallspace.org.uk/about.html

wool yarn and rope plus site
dimensions (approx): h: 7m / w: 15m
18 Mar to 13 Apr 2009

Thanks to: Martin Curtis of Curtis Wool Direct, Bingley, West Yorkshire - for giving the wool 
Patrick Sweeney and Clive Burton - technical consultants 

Photos: Julian Wright / David Carr-Smith

LINK: Making the work


When I first visited All Hallows church I was struck by the soft creamy colour of the ceiling and its flower-like patterns - suggestive of the qualities of undyed wool. I went away with the thought of making a work that connects the ceiling to the floor. Coincidentally the installation was timed to coincide with Easter.

A huge quantity of wool was given me by two generous Yorkshire sponsors: Martin Curtis and Andrew Marshall. Martin Curtis told me the average sheep produces around 2 kilos, which when washed loses a third of its weight in grease and dirt. I was thus given - in washed and spun wool the approximate equivalent of 55 fleeces!

The hank of wool that constitutes the bulk of the work was formed over five weeks by laying down parallel threads pulled off wool-wound cones. This 25 meter long, 75 kilo trunk-like mass was hauled up and suspended over the nave by its centre, falling in two 'cascades' that part in a 'doorway' and flood out across the floor. The uncompromising cross of tense rope and knots that bind the giant hank's centre, contrasts with the relaxing and complexifying of the released wool, spreading like the foam and streamlets of a beaching wave.

PHOTO: JULIAN WRIGH                                               
 
PHOTO: MARCO PEREIRA                                                           

 

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"PAPER WINDOWS"  -  A GROUP EXHIBITION,  INNOVATION GALLERY,  CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS INNOVATION,  PROCTER STREET,  LONDON,  WC1

paper with pencil and scalpel drawing
9 to 18 Dec 2008

Photos: David Carr-Smith


The work reproduced the gallery windows in artists' paper. Tests began in Sep 2008 and I started making the work in Nov 2008.

Half the gallery is windows - so demanding of wall that they limited hanging to small images on the room's cluttered inner sides. Seventeen window panels bracket the space - a procession of fourteen 3-row panels whose inner ends slow to a stop via panels of 2.

After the cement-blinded windows of the "Powerhouse" exterior, these gridded walls of translucent glass presented another type and degree of enclosure and obscurification. The big pool of dark floor offered a space to reflect them. I drew the 17 window-grids with pencil and scalpel at 1:1 scale on artists' paper and layered them on the floor like a fallen homage - only their leaved edges showed their number. The twin 2-row "misfit" grids were flung 'randomly' across the "standard" 3-row stack. The excised paper 'panes' had curled themselves into tubes which huddled near the reclining grids, pining for rôle and positions.

 

     

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."POWER HOUSE"  -  INSTALLATION ON STREET FACADES,  R.K.BURT ARTISTS' PAPER WAREHOUSE,  UNION STREET,  LONDON, SE1 

site plus cable-hung 'blinds' of PVC-polyester with "Grafisoft" adhesive-vinal drawings
dimensions: x3 blinds = h: 6.4m / w: 2m // x1 blind = h: 6.4m / w: 2.4m // x1 blind = h: 3.8m / w: 4.58m
Initially a public-site installation for the London Festival of Architecture 2008 (LFA)
28 June 2008 to 20 Jan 2009  /  28 June 2009 to 3 Sept 2009

Thanks to:  R.K. Burt & Co Ltd., Wholesale Paper Merchants, 57 Union Street, London SE1 1SG - for loan of building facades 
Siddons Van & Car Hire, 191D Perry Vale, SE23 - for logistical assistance 
Patrick Sweeney - technical consultant

Photos: David Carr-Smith / Gary Black

LINK: Making and installing the work


In late 2007 I discovered this Union Street 1930’s ex electricity sub station, now  R. K. Burt artists' paper warehouse. The blinded rendered windows of this somber building reminded me of canvases waiting to be painted. The windows had probably been blocked at the beginning of the war, the spaces they once occupied are clearly defined.

I chose to install blinds for these blind windows. These blinds relate to several aspects of the building, most importantly they have an energy which will transform it. The 5 panels are a rhythmical sequence: 4 tall ones on the main façade - the first wider, the next 3 a repeated beat; then around the corner facing east, the 5th - squarer, placed high up, ‘floating’ - provides a full stop. The blinds connect with the building’s past through colours associated with electricity, live wires and cables - the sub station previously humming inside is evoked on the outside. They also express an affinity with the ghosts of its window mullions. Finally, in their role as drawings they refer to the building’s present use by artists’ paper merchants.

 

The building is situated close to several derelict houses encased in scaffolding, despite this there is a feeling of a village at this end of Union Street - the road splits in two as it approaches Southwark Bridge Road and the remaining island has a large spreading plane tree, café, outdoor seating, while overhead the trains trundle past. I wanted to add something dynamic to this end of the street, something that speaks of summertime!

 

     

               

               
                
                
                
PHOTO: GARY BLACK                   
               

 

 

INSTALLATION AT "1DEA5PAC7" 157 BELLENDEN ROAD,  LONDON,  SE15  
1DEA5PAC7@aol.com  /  07958543698

torn and knotted wedding-tulle in context
## Mar to 28 Apr 2007


Photos:
David Carr-Smith


This is a reuse of the material remains of 'Church-Work 3' [see below]; brought into an environment where it is made to relate to practical inventions - a context described by its curators as 'an interface between retail and the aesthetics of conceptual art and design'.

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"RAG-RUG" -  ACCOUNTANT'S OFFICE,  BRUCE GROVE,  LONDON,  N17

plate-shards and glue
June 2006 to --- current
viewable by appointment: john@zipress.com


Photos:
David Carr-Smith


I was surprised at Angela's wall-work's unexpected 'extra' effects. It has a weird likeness to a rug-like object hung on the wall, an impression contradicted by the fact that its myri
ad little pieces are undeniably stuck to the wall ... emphasised of course by a cascade of glue-threads, which however simultaneously reinforce the impression of frayed rug!  Its ambiguity is also emphasised by its slight tendency to lean (this accumulated as it was made and was unresisted) as if carelessly nailed up at a slight angle.

 

 

"OVERLOOKED"  - GREEN DRAGON COURT,  BOROUGH MARKET,  LONDON, SE1

fragments of unfired woven porcelain clay plus site
A public-site installation for the London Architecture Biennale 2006 
17 to 25 June 2006


Photos:
David Carr-Smith
/ Angela Wright

LINK: Making and installing the work


Borough Market is a complicated, seemingly chaotic, sequence of joined irregular spaces, lanes and small roads, among the pillars and under the iron trusses and decking supporting a confluence of rail-lines issuing from London Bridge and Cannon Street stations.

A very busy and vital market thrives here - intensely bustling and full. On empty days with the stalls shuttered and produce boxed behind wire grills one is aware of old dirt, refuse in corners and the damp cold of decorated but industrial iron - then people only pass through what has become simply a vague container of routes that connect to elsewhere.

In the most forgotten unnoticed fenced-off and dirt-accumulating corner of all - yet in full and public view of any primed to see those parts of a scene which for most are edited-out by habits of practical use - I decided to install a work which contradicts its site's character and 'fulfills' its primacy of location.

This filthy rat-ridden corner holds a psychological fascination for me and seemed to fit the Biennale’s theme of 'Change'. The space is strangely overlooked by a single domestic window which gives it a feeling of a courtyard which hardly sees the daylight. Gigantic steel railway beams on cliffs of Victorian yellow brick encase its dirt floor. The space is filthy from years of uselessness and neglect, yet spatially contiguous with the bright, colourful, vital and thronged Green Market, and incongruously facing across it the tree-edged close of Southwark Cathedral, an enclave of relaxation, calm and reassuring gothic styling. 

I made a fragile and ephemeral floor of unfired porcelain pieces, propped against each other, moving out from the rear of the space like a luminous flood or a fleece thrown down in the gloom. Bearing down from above are massive rivet-studded girders, skirting a small triangle of bright sky that mirrors my triangular floor. My addition to this site must be viewed with its context - some of its relations with the site were forseen, others (even obvious ones) have emerged - the subconscious, initially perceived as fascination with the 'atmosphere' of the place, has apparently also been influencing decisions while I made the work.

It is the extremes that I am interested in. I hope you see that I have changed the site's dynamics, cleaned and purified it, possibly given it the feel of a side-chapel with an inclosed peace. It looks towards the cathedral with its blossoming trees, honeysuckle, and passion flowers growing on the walls. Perhaps the rats, grime and the smell of urine recedes for a moment.

         

 



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